I Can’t Find a Qualified Intern

You’ve posted your add and now you are anxiously waiting for the resumes to roll in. Problem is, you can’t seem to find a qualifed intern. The resumes you have receieved don’t line up with the position description or, you aren’t getting any resumes at all.

What’s the deal? You are trying to give a young person an opportunity to learn your business and gain some real experience, but can’t seem to find the right person for the job.

Well, it is possible that you are the problem.

Often employers embark on the journey to find an intern without a firm understanding of what they really need in an intern, where to find internship candidates and what attracts good internship candidates. You might be guilty of one or all of these things. Take a step back and evaluate a few things about your internship opening and see how your program measures up in your quest to find a qualified intern.

Don’t be cheap, pay your interns

Nobody wants to work for free. Maybe 20 years ago unpaid internships were popular, but 20 years ago college didn’t cost on average almost $30,000 a year for an in-state public college. The average private school costs about $50,000 per year (source). With those types of bills looming and many college students needing to contribute heavily to pay for college, working for free just isn’t always feasible. If your internship doesn’t pay, you might miss out on quality candidates based on the fact that they can’t afford to work for you.

Unpaid programs can be biased towards those that can afford to work for free. Your talent and applicant pool will automatically decrease. If you want to compete for the best talent, then you need to find a way to pay your interns.

In addition to limiting your internship pool, unpaid internships are also potentially against the law. There are certain criteria you must meet as an employer in order to offer an unpaid internship.

You need an employee not an intern

Internships for undergraduate students that require two years of professional work experience are just insane and unfair. Internships are about gaining experience, about learning, about teaching. To want an intern with professional level credentials is just not reasonable, especially if you are not paying. Yes, you need your intern to have some skills and ability to contribute, but measure your needs and wants versus the reality of what an intern can bring.




If your internships is designed specficially for a recent graduate or graduate student, be specific with what you are looking for. Don’t be surprised, however, if candidates with stronger credentials may look for some type compensation.

Searching for Qualified Interns

Where you looking for interns? Have you posted to indeed.com and the other major job boards. That is a good start, but when searching for interns go to where they are. There are websites and job boards for companies specifically looking for interns. Internship job boards like wayup.com, youtern.com and internships.com give you more exposure to your audience. Social media sites like LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook can’t be ignored when trying to find college students to work for you.

Locally, check with the colleges and universities in your own backyard. Start with their career services offices and then go to the appropraite academic department that would have the types of students you are looking for.

Lastly, partner with an organization that seeks out talent for you. If you have the budget to participate, internship programs like the T. Howard Foundation, Year Up, and other internship recruitement organizations can provide you with resumes of pre-screened qualified candidates to fill your openings.

Do you want to work for you

Does your internship job descprition make you want to work there? If the opportunity you are offering doesn’t sound interesting to you, then it may not be appealing to anyone else either. A job description that sounds like making copies, running errands and getting coffee is not the “real world” experiene students are looking for. In addition to the qualifications for the role, your ad needs to communicate what the intern will learn, the benefits, responsibilities and skills they will gain. It also is helpful to include a brief description of the company.

Looking for the right fit, the right intern, starts with understanding your internship program. Here are 10 Steps to Launching a Successful Internship Program so that you can evealate and understand your program and in turn, attract the right candidate.

Interns can be a wonderful addition to your team. Don’t give up the search, just make sure you are searching the right way.

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Sharise

Freelance Writer | Internship Expert at The Internship Manual | Sharise Kent
Sharise Kent is an internship expert and freelance writer. She spent 5 years managing a national internship program where she placed over 400 interns with some of the biggest media companies in the world.

Latest posts by Sharise (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *